Thanks for making the process easy!

I worked with Shannon processing my late father’s estate. I really appreciated her (and Beliveau’s) professionalism. Shannon is knowledgeable, hard working, organized, technically and mathematically savvy when it came to the estate taxes, and very communicative via email which I really appreciated. I felt confident that I was in good hands. Thank you much!!


Tax checklist for business startups

Starting your own business can be equal parts thrilling and intimidating. Complying with regulations and tax requirements definitely falls into the latter category. But, with some professional help, it doesn’t have to be that way. You can get started with this checklist of things you’ll need to consider.

  • Are you a hobby or a business? This may seem basic to some people, but the first thing you’ll have to consider when starting out is whether you really are operating a business, or pursuing a hobby. A hobby can look like a business, but essentially it’s something you do for its own sake that may or may not turn a profit. A true business is generally run for the purpose of making money and has a reasonable expectation of turning a profit. The benefit of operating as a business is that you have more tax tools available to you, such as being able to deduct your losses.
  • Pick your business structure. If you operate as a business, you’ll have to choose whether it will be taxed as a sole proprietorship, partnership, S corporation or C corporation. All entities except C corporations “pass through” their business income onto your personal tax return. The decision gets more complicated if you legally organize your business as a limited liability corporation (LLC). In this case you will need to choose your tax status as either a partnership or an S corporation. Each tax structure has its benefits and downsides – it’s best to discuss what is best for you. [Read more…]

Answers to commonly asked tax questions

With all of the headlines about the changes to tax law, you probably have lots of questions. Here are answers to some of the most common questions taxpayers have this year.

Q. I’m hearing about a lot of changes to 2018 taxes. What should I do?

A. You’re right, there are a lot of changes in 2018 due to the passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), including to the income tax brackets. The simple answer to the question, “What should I do?” is to not make any major changes until you finish filing your 2017 taxes. Once you understand your 2017 tax obligation, you are in a better position to plan for 2018.

However, there are a few things you can start thinking about now. Depending on where you fall in the new income tax brackets, you may want to consider ways to lower your taxable income. This could include increasing your contributions to 401(k) retirement accounts or health savings accounts (HSAs). You’ll also want to make sure your employer has adjusted your federal tax withholding so that you don’t have to wait to receive a large refund (or tax bill) next year. You can review the IRS withholding calculator using your latest pay stub data to make sure the changes are accurate. [Read more…]

Alert: Expired home and education tax breaks revived

Congress passed a federal budget bill in early February that revived dozens of expired tax breaks for the 2017 tax year. They include a deduction for education expenses as well as several tax breaks for homeowners.

If you have not yet filed your 2017 tax return, please be aware these late changes are retroactive to the beginning of 2017. Check out this list of the most useful tax breaks to see if they apply to your situation:

Tuition and fees deduction. If you paid qualified tuition and related higher education expenses, you may be able to deduct as much as $4,000 of those costs. This can be done on a regular return (without itemizing). The deduction is capped at $4,000 for single filers with adjusted gross income (AGI) of $65,000 or less ($130,000 joint) and at $2,000 for single filers with AGI of $80,000 or less ($160,000 joint). [Read more…]

Tax filing reminders

March 1 – Farmers and fishermen who did not make 2017 estimated tax payments must file 2017 tax returns and pay taxes in full.

March 2 – Automatic extension deadline for employers and health care providers to provide Forms 1095-B and 1095-C to individuals.

March 15

  • 2017 calendar-year S corporation income tax returns are due.
  • 2017 partnership returns are due.
  • Deadline for calendar-year corporations to elect S corporation status for 2018.

Law revoking beneficiary status didn’t apply retroactively

A new decision from a federal appeals court should give every divorced person incentive to look over his or her insurance policies and other financial documents to make sure beneficiaries have been changed. This holds true even in states with laws that automatically revoke a now-ex-spouse’s beneficiary status upon divorce.

The federal appeals court case concerned Minnesota couple Mark Sveen and Kay Melin, who got married in 1997. Mark had two children from a prior marriage and these kids were the primary beneficiaries on a life insurance policy that he had in place. But once he got married, Mark made Kay his primary beneficiary, with his kids as beneficiaries of a different policy.

The couple divorced after 10 years. Mark never removed Kay as the beneficiary after the divorce, although Kay claims that Mark agreed to keep her as the beneficiary in exchange for giving him a better property settlement. [Read more…]

Spat between parents may constitute ‘change in circumstances’

It’s never easy for a kid to be shuttled back and forth between two divorced parents who cannot communicate constructively. But it can get even worse for a child as he or she gets older and becomes more aware of the hostility between his or her parents. If a recent decision out of North Carolina is any indication, this growing awareness of the parents’ hatred toward one another may even be grounds for modifying a custody order.

In that case, a couple divorced in 2012 and a judge awarded the father primary physical care and custody of the couple’s young daughter “Reagan.” The judge apparently made this decision based on the couple’s “utter inability” to work together for their daughter’s benefit as well as the mother’s repeated, unsubstantiated allegations that the father was abusing Reagan.

Two years later the mother asked the court to modify the custody order, claiming that the father’s new girlfriend was acting as Reagan’s primary caregiver. A trial judge granted the motion, citing “changed circumstances” and giving the mother primary custody.  Specifically, the judge found that the parents still couldn’t communicate effectively and that Reagan, who was getting older and becoming more aware of the situation, was experiencing increasingly higher anxiety as a result. He also noted that the father and his girlfriend were keeping Reagan away from other family members and that the mother was no longer making false abuse allegations. [Read more…]

Husband held in contempt for non-payment despite waiver

A husband could be cited for contempt of court for failing to make agreed-upon payments to his ex-wife even though she had waived the right to “spousal support” in their divorce decree, the Virginia Court of Appeals recently decided.

In that case, as part of the property settlement the husband agreed to make a $40,000 lump-sum payment, to be satisfied in 16 equal monthly installments.

The divorce agreement contained a section entitled “alimony” in which both parties stated that they were waiving any right to receive alimony or “spousal support” payments in the future. The husband also agreed to pay for his wife’s health insurance for the next year and a half. The final decree created some confusion by stating that the amount of “periodic support” was expressed in fixed sums (presumably meaning the $40,000 lump sum) and set out a schedule for payment of “periodic spousal support” (presumably meaning the 16 installments). [Read more…]

Adult child’s ‘failure to launch’ doesn’t justify child support

In most states, the obligation to pay child support ends when the child turns 18. In some states it may end when the child graduates from high school, if that comes first. Minor children also generally can become “emancipated” through a court proceeding if they can support themselves, if they join the military, or if they get married. At that point, the obligation to pay child support ends. But the obligation to pay support can continue past age 18 if the money is used to pay for the adult child’s education or if the adult child is disabled.

What about an adult child who’s still living with one of the parents and just hasn’t figured out a way to support himself? Is the other parent required to pay support in that case?

A recent decision from an appeals court in New Jersey indicates that the answer is “No.” [Read more…]

Will you get credit in property division for footing household bills during divorce?

An issue that frequently arises when a marriage breaks up is who pays the household bills while the divorce is pending. A lot of times the spouse who paid the bills during the marriage will continue to pay utility bills and homeowner’s association or condo fees while making mortgage payments on the marital home. If you’re the one making those payments, you’re probably wondering whether a divorce judge will give you some sort of credit for it when dividing up the marital property. In other words, will you get a bigger share of the remaining property in consideration for the bills you’ve paid or be saddled with a smaller share of marital debt?

The answer is that it depends on the situation and the laws where you live.

Take, for example, a recent case from North Carolina, where it all came down to the concept of “active” versus “passive” decreases to marital debt. [Read more…]