Have adult children? Take steps to avoid medical access denial

Imagine your college-aged daughter has an accident while away at school and ends up in the emergency room. When you call the hospital, you are denied information about her care because you do not have the proper forms signed. Under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), you do not have legal access to your child’s health information after they reach age 18, even if your child is still your dependent and their health insurance coverage is in your name. To avoid this administrative nightmare, take the following steps.

  1. Make sure your health insurance coverage will cover your child at his or her new campus home.
  2. Have your son or daughter sign a HIPAA authorization form allowing you access to their medical information. [Read more…]

Learn from the ‘best places to work’

Google, Facebook, and Southwest Airlines are among the top five companies on job search site Indeed’s “Best Places to Work 2017” list. You may not have the resources of these large companies, but you can incorporate some of their ideas into your company’s culture.

Respect. The best companies cultivate a culture of respect, according to a poll conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management. Employees say they feel valued by their leaders and their coworkers regardless of their background, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or gender.

Opportunities for growth. Leaders at the best companies evaluate staff regularly and look for ways to challenge them in new areas.

[Read more…]

Your HSA as a retirement tool – the facts

Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) are a great way to pay for medical expenses, and since unused funds roll over from year to year, the account can also provide a source of retirement funds in addition to other plans like 401(k)s or IRAs. But be aware of how HSAs compare to other retirement investment tools.

  • HSAs work best when they are used to pay for qualified medical expenses. Neither your original contributions to an HSA nor your investment earnings are taxed when used this way.
  • There is no required minimum distribution after you reach age 70½, like there is with 401(k)s and IRAs. [Read more…]

Review your condo bylaws before renting out your place on Airbnb

Renting out your condo on Airbnb might seem like a great way to make some extra money. But before you jump on the opportunity, it’s wise to check your condo association bylaws.

In most cases, you’ll find that the bylaws include restrictions on “leasing.” For example, the rules might state that no unit can be rented for less than 6 or 12 months at a time, or they might state that a unit can’t be used as a hotel.

These provisions exist because the Federal Housing Administration, which is the biggest mortgage lender nationwide, places restrictions on the number of renters a condo complex can have. Generally, the rule is that no more than 50 percent of tenants in any complex can be renters, except in particular cases where it’s 35 percent. [Read more…]

Check your bank’s real estate notices twice

When a bank goes through a merger or agrees to buy or sell mortgage loans, certain notices must be provided to borrowers before and after the transaction closes. Federal law states clearly what notices are required and how they must be worded, but sometimes the legal rules conflict with each other.

It’s helpful to have an attorney review any notices you receive to ensure that they are in compliance with federal law and evaluate how they impact the terms of your loan.

Under a federal law called the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act of 1974 (RESPA), when a bank or loan servicer transfers the servicing of a residential mortgage loan, borrowers must be provided with written notice by both the transferor and the transferee, including: 1) the effective date; 2) the date on which the transferor will stop accepting payments and the date on which the transferee will begin to accept payments; 3) the name and address of the transferor and a collect or toll-free telephone number to call with questions about servicing; 4) an explanation of any impact on the terms and availability of related insurance coverage; and 5) a statement indicating that the transfer only affects terms directly related to the servicing of the loan. [Read more…]

Don’t let surprise costs of your home purchase shock you

If you’re buying a house, the total price you’ll end up paying is more than meets the eye.

Usually, a buyer pays between 2 percent and 5 percent of the home purchase price in closing costs. Lenders often disclose these costs, but they aren’t the only hidden fees you need to consider.

Other fees to keep in mind include payments to appraisers, home inspectors and settlement agents, as well as the cost of title insurance, homeowners’ insurance and property taxes. [Read more…]

If your house burns down, do you still have to pay your mortgage?

At the closing for your home purchase or refinancing, you are required to sign a promissory note that says you’ll make the mortgage payments every month. That agreement remains in effect even if your house burns down. You’re also required to report any loss to the lender and your insurance carrier promptly.

But a reprieve is still possible. For example, a lender might allow a borrower to suspend mortgage payments for a defined period of time or might put a hold on foreclosure activity.

Based on the standard Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac mortgage form, a borrower must repair or restore the property as long as that is financially possible, unless there is a different agreement between the parties. As a result, you can’t simply walk away after a fire. If you do, you risk defaulting on your mortgage. [Read more…]

Credit monitoring: Be aware the credit score you get might be different than lenders receive

Subscribing to a credit monitoring service to keep tabs on your credit score can be a helpful way to manage and protect your credit.

But did you know that the score you purchase isn’t always the same as the one the lender obtains from a credit reporting agency?

That comes as a surprise to many borrowers. But the real questions are why is this the case and what can you do about it? [Read more…]

Reverse mortgages increasingly available for high-value homes

Seniors with pricier homes now have an increased ability to get a bigger reverse mortgage in order to raise cash for retirement. As the housing market has improved, so-called jumbo reverse mortgages are becoming more popular even though they carry some risk.

Reverse mortgages allow homeowners who are at least 62 years of age to borrow money on their house. The homeowner receives a sum of money from the lender, based largely on the value of the house, the age of the borrower and current interest rates. The loan does not need to be paid back until the last surviving homeowner dies, sells the house or permanently moves out. Homeowners can use money from a reverse mortgage to pay for improvements to their home, to allow them to delay taking Social Security or to pay for home health care, among other things.

The most widely available reverse mortgage product is the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM), the only reverse mortgage program insured by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA). However, the FHA sets a ceiling on the amount that can be borrowed against a single-family house, which is determined on a county-by-county basis. The national limit on the amount a homeowner can borrow is $625,000.  [Read more…]

Don’t wait until it’s too late to execute a power of attorney

A durable power of attorney is an extremely important estate planning tool, often more important than a will.  If you become incapacitated due to dementia or some other reason, this crucial document allows a person you appoint (your “attorney-in-fact” or “agent”) to act in place of you (the “principal” ) for financial purposes.  The agent under the power of attorney can quickly step in and take care of your affairs.

But in order to execute a power of attorney and name an agent to stand in your shoes, you need to have capacity.  Regrettably, many people delay completing this vital estate planning step until it’s too late and they no longer are legally capable of doing it.

What happens then? Without a durable power of attorney, no one can represent you unless a court appoints a conservator or guardian. That court process takes time and costs money, and the judge may not choose the person you would prefer. In addition, under a guardianship or conservatorship the representative may have to seek court permission to take planning steps that he or she could have implemented immediately under a simple durable power of attorney. [Read more…]