Excellent

Mary was very thorough, responsive and detail oriented. She was a pleasure to work with and did a spectacular job with my closing. I’d recommend her strongly.

~Jeremy

IRS now allows private debt collectors to dun taxpayers

In a move that could be confusing to seniors who are vulnerable to scams, the IRS is using private debt collection agencies to collect past-due taxes. The new program began in April 2017.

Pursuant to a law Congress passed in December 2015, the IRS may now contract with private debt collectors to collect certain debts. The private collection agencies can work on accounts where the taxpayer owes money but the IRS is no longer actively working on the account, perhaps because it is older or because the IRS does not have the resources to continue pursuing it.

Historically, scammers have posed as the IRS to target seniors and other vulnerable adults to retrieve identifying information or payment. Up until now, tax professionals have been able to reassure clients that the IRS would never harass consumers over the phone. However, under this new rule private debt collectors may contact taxpayers by phone, which may make it more difficult to determine whether a scammer is targeting the taxpayer.  [Read more…]

Five things to know to reduce your tax on capital gains

Although it is often said that nothing is certain except death and taxes, the one tax you may be able to avoid or minimize the most through planning is the tax on capital gains. Here’s what you need to know to do such planning:

What is capital gain? Capital gain is the difference between the “basis” in property (usually real estate or stocks, but also including artwork and collectibles) and its selling price. The basis is usually the purchase price of the property. So, if you purchased a house for $250,000 and sold it for $450,000 you would have $200,000 of gain ($450,000 – $250,000 = $200,000). [Read more…]

Using a prepaid funeral contract to spend down assets for Medicaid

No one wants to think about his or her death, but a little preparation in the form of a prepaid funeral contract can be useful. In addition to helping your family after your passing, a prepaid funeral contract can be a good way to spend down assets in order to qualify for Medicaid.

A prepaid or pre-need contract allows you to purchase funeral goods and services before you die. The contract can be entered into with a funeral home or cemetery. Prepaid funeral contracts can include payments for embalming and restoration; a room for the funeral service; a casket, vault or grave liner; cremation; transportation; permits; a headstone; a death certificate; and an obituary, among other things.

One benefit of a prepaid funeral contract is that you are paying now for a service that may increase in price — possibly saving your family money. You are also saving your family from having to make arrangements after you die, which can be difficult and time-consuming. [Read more…]

Estate planning for a single person

If you are single, you may not think you need to plan your estate.  But single people have as much reason to plan as anyone else. Estate planning not only involves determining where your assets will go when you die, it also helps you plan for what will happen should you become incapacitated, perhaps as the result of a stroke, dementia, or injury. If you don’t make a plan, you will have no say in what happens to you or your assets.

Without a properly executed will in place when you die, your estate will be distributed according to state law. If you are single, most states provide that your estate will go to your children, parents, or other living relatives. If you have absolutely no living relatives, then your estate will go to the state. This may not be what you want to have happen to your assets. You may have charities, close friends, or particular relatives that you want to provide for after your death.

If you become incapacitated without any planning, a court will have to determine who will have the authority to handle your finances and make health care decisions for you. The court may not choose the person you would have chosen. In addition, going to court to set up a guardianship is time-consuming and expensive. [Read more…]

The best way to avoid an audit: Preparation

Getting audited by the IRS is no fun. Some taxpayers are selected for random audits every year, but the chances of that happening to you are very small. You are much more likely to fall under the IRS’s gaze if you make one of several common mistakes.

That means your best chance of avoiding an audit is by doing things right before you file your return this year. Here are some suggestions:

Don’t leave anything out. Missing or incomplete information on your return will trigger an audit letter automatically, since the IRS gets copies of the same tax forms (such as W-2s and 1099s) that you do. [Read more…]

Mileage rates for 2018

The IRS recently announced mileage rates to be used for travel in 2018. The standard business mileage rate increased by 1 cent to 54.5 cents per mile. The medical and moving mileage rates also increased by 1 cent, to 18 cents per mile. Charitable mileage rates remained unchanged at 14 cents per mile.

Remember to properly document your mileage to receive full credit for your miles driven.

Looking ahead: Tax reform in 2018

Congress has passed tax reform that will take effect in 2018, ushering in some of the most significant tax changes in three decades. Here are some major items in the new bill that impact individual taxpayers.

Reduces income tax brackets. The bill retains seven brackets, but at reduced rates, with the highest tax bracket dropping to 37 percent from 39.6 percent.

Double standard deductions. The standard deduction nearly doubles to $12,000 for single filers and $24,000 for married filing jointly. To help cover the cost, personal exemptions and most additional standard deductions are suspended.

[Read more…]

Tax filing reminders

January 16 – Due date for the fourth installment of 2017 individual estimated tax.

January 31 –

  • Due date for employers to furnish W-2 statements to employees, and to file Forms W-2 with the Social Security Administration (both paper and electronic forms).
  • Due date for payers to provide most Forms 1099-MISC with non-employee compensation in box 7 to recipients and to the IRS.
  • Employers must file 2017 federal unemployment tax returns and pay any tax due.
  • Due date for providers to send Forms 1095 to recipients and the IRS.

Revised: Tax Cuts and Jobs Act: What the Tax Reform Bill Means for You

Revised: 12/28/2017

Congress has passed a tax reform act that will take effect in 2018, ushering in some of the most significant tax changes in three decades. There are a lot of changes in the new act, which was signed into law on Dec. 22, 2017.

You can use this memo as a high-level overview of some of the most significant items in the new act. Because major tax reform like this happens so seldom, it may be worthwhile for you to schedule a tax-planning consultation early in the year to ensure you reap the most tax savings possible during 2018. [Read more…]