Be sure to protect your privacy in a divorce

If you’re like most people, you’ve probably read stories about celebrity divorces, seen their dirty laundry aired in public and maybe even breathed a sigh of relief that you’re not in that boat. But even if you’re a relative nobody, your privacy can still be compromised during a divorce, causing you both emotional and financial harm.

That’s because a divorce is a legal proceeding, and in most states court documents are a matter of public record.

So how can you protect yourself? First, many states allow you to withhold certain highly confidential pieces of information from publicly searchable court documents. This includes Social Security numbers, driver’s license numbers, your mother’s maiden name and other types of information that can be used for identity theft and fraud purposes — or to gain access to other compromising information about you that you want to keep private. It’s a great idea to talk to a family law attorney where you live to see what kind of identifying information you can protect in court papers and how to do so. [Read more…]

Grandparent rights can be complicated, recent cases show

For grandparents fighting for the right to see their grandkids, a couple of cases out of Virginia suggest that it may be easier to hold onto visitation rights that a court has already granted then to go to court and secure them in the first place.

Take the case of Ohio couple Delmar and Susan Lang. Their son died a year after he and their daughter-in-law Melanie got divorced. The Langs’ relationship with Melanie soon fell apart and she tried to keep them from seeing their four grandchildren.

The Langs went to court and a Ohio judge granted them visitation. But Melanie moved to Virginia, where she registered the Ohio order and asked a Virginia court to modify it and strip the Langs of visitation rights. [Read more…]

Too much Pokemon Go? Parents battle over screen time

Divorced parents can battle over a lot of things, including child support, bedtimes, who gets the kids for Thanksgiving or Christmas, educational philosophy, religious observances and stepparents newly arrived on the scene.

Now there’s the issue of screen time. With the increasing pervasiveness of tablets and smart phones, particularly among the younger set, it’s as common to see kids glued to their iPhones or iPads as it is to see adults. But studies show that too much screen time isn’t great for kids. It impacts their attention span and their cognitive abilities, and they can easily become addicted.

So what happens when you want your kids’ screen time limited and your ex is perfectly happy to have them become technology zombies? [Read more…]

Issues to consider before relocating after a divorce

People move for a lot of reasons. Maybe you have an awesome career opportunity in a distant city or you either want to be closer to a new romantic interest or live in an area where you’ve got better odds of finding one. Perhaps you’re a city girl who’s sick of living in the sticks or a country boy who can’t stand the hassles of urban life. Maybe you want to be near the beach or really good skiing.

But whatever your reason for relocating might be, a big move can be a lot more complicated if you’re divorced with kids. If you’re in that boat, it’s important to be aware of certain issues that can arise and talk to a family law attorney about how best to address them.

The biggest issue to consider before relocating is how the move might affect your parenting plan. If you’re like a lot of divorced couples living in the same area you very likely share parenting time. Perhaps it’s joint custody split right down the middle where the kids spend half the week with you and half the week with your ex-spouse, or maybe your ex has the kids one night a week and every other weekend. If you’re moving, say, 250 miles away, your arrangement will no longer be feasible. In that case, your relocation will require modification of your custody agreement. [Read more…]

Have adult children? Take steps to avoid medical access denial

Imagine your college-aged daughter has an accident while away at school and ends up in the emergency room. When you call the hospital, you are denied information about her care because you do not have the proper forms signed. Under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), you do not have legal access to your child’s health information after they reach age 18, even if your child is still your dependent and their health insurance coverage is in your name. To avoid this administrative nightmare, take the following steps.

  1. Make sure your health insurance coverage will cover your child at his or her new campus home.
  2. Have your son or daughter sign a HIPAA authorization form allowing you access to their medical information. [Read more…]

Learn from the ‘best places to work’

Google, Facebook, and Southwest Airlines are among the top five companies on job search site Indeed’s “Best Places to Work 2017” list. You may not have the resources of these large companies, but you can incorporate some of their ideas into your company’s culture.

Respect. The best companies cultivate a culture of respect, according to a poll conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management. Employees say they feel valued by their leaders and their coworkers regardless of their background, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or gender.

Opportunities for growth. Leaders at the best companies evaluate staff regularly and look for ways to challenge them in new areas.

[Read more…]

Your HSA as a retirement tool – the facts

Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) are a great way to pay for medical expenses, and since unused funds roll over from year to year, the account can also provide a source of retirement funds in addition to other plans like 401(k)s or IRAs. But be aware of how HSAs compare to other retirement investment tools.

  • HSAs work best when they are used to pay for qualified medical expenses. Neither your original contributions to an HSA nor your investment earnings are taxed when used this way.
  • There is no required minimum distribution after you reach age 70½, like there is with 401(k)s and IRAs. [Read more…]

Review your condo bylaws before renting out your place on Airbnb

Renting out your condo on Airbnb might seem like a great way to make some extra money. But before you jump on the opportunity, it’s wise to check your condo association bylaws.

In most cases, you’ll find that the bylaws include restrictions on “leasing.” For example, the rules might state that no unit can be rented for less than 6 or 12 months at a time, or they might state that a unit can’t be used as a hotel.

These provisions exist because the Federal Housing Administration, which is the biggest mortgage lender nationwide, places restrictions on the number of renters a condo complex can have. Generally, the rule is that no more than 50 percent of tenants in any complex can be renters, except in particular cases where it’s 35 percent. [Read more…]

Check your bank’s real estate notices twice

When a bank goes through a merger or agrees to buy or sell mortgage loans, certain notices must be provided to borrowers before and after the transaction closes. Federal law states clearly what notices are required and how they must be worded, but sometimes the legal rules conflict with each other.

It’s helpful to have an attorney review any notices you receive to ensure that they are in compliance with federal law and evaluate how they impact the terms of your loan.

Under a federal law called the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act of 1974 (RESPA), when a bank or loan servicer transfers the servicing of a residential mortgage loan, borrowers must be provided with written notice by both the transferor and the transferee, including: 1) the effective date; 2) the date on which the transferor will stop accepting payments and the date on which the transferee will begin to accept payments; 3) the name and address of the transferor and a collect or toll-free telephone number to call with questions about servicing; 4) an explanation of any impact on the terms and availability of related insurance coverage; and 5) a statement indicating that the transfer only affects terms directly related to the servicing of the loan. [Read more…]

Don’t let surprise costs of your home purchase shock you

If you’re buying a house, the total price you’ll end up paying is more than meets the eye.

Usually, a buyer pays between 2 percent and 5 percent of the home purchase price in closing costs. Lenders often disclose these costs, but they aren’t the only hidden fees you need to consider.

Other fees to keep in mind include payments to appraisers, home inspectors and settlement agents, as well as the cost of title insurance, homeowners’ insurance and property taxes. [Read more…]