Employer couldn’t force religious worker to use hand scanner

Title VII of the federal Civil Rights Act requires employers to make “reasonable accommodations” for their workers’ religious beliefs. Employers who disregard this, even when the religious beliefs seem bizarre, run the risk of liability, as a mining company in West Virginia recently learned.

In that case, a coal miner refused to use a new biometric scanner that the employer had installed as an identification device. The miner apparently feared that use of the scanner would give him the “Mark of the Beast,” which according to the Book of Revelations would then brand him a follower of the Antichrist. He requested an alternative identification measure as a form of religious accommodation.

The employer denied the request. The employee resigned and sued for religious discrimination under Title VII. A jury found in his favor and a federal appeals court affirmed, rejecting the employer’s argument that the scanner neither left any kind of mark nor legitimately conflicted with the employee’s religious beliefs.

According to the appellate court, none of this mattered. All that mattered was that the miner’s beliefs were sincerely held and, given the fact that the employer had provided alternative identification procedures for employees with hand injuries, the requested accommodation wouldn’t have imposed any hardship.